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Tag: Fallout

Posts related to video games in the Fallout series.

Rads & Butts

Rads & Butts

FALLOUT FEVER: There may have been a gap of a week between episodes, but our hosts are still in the throes of Fallout, as they have both picked up Bethesda Game Studio’s Fallout 76 (again, for Andrew; the first time, for Dan). They recount its rocky origins, what kind of MMO it is, and what they are both trying to get out of it.

RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • Quite Easily Done” (8 June 2018): Where our hosts discuss the No Clip documentary on the history of Bethesda Game Studios.
  • A Sense of Place” (30 November 2018): Where Andrew gives his initial impressions up Fallout 76‘s original release.
  • The 2-Body Solution” (29 March 2024): Where D. Bethel excitedly shares his thoughts on Balatro.
  • Jersey Finger” (26 April 2024): Where our hosts discuss the Fallout television show on Amazon Prime.

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Jersey Finger

Jersey Finger

RELEASING THE EMBRACE: Our hosts start with some wild news about the Embracer Group and how, after years of buying––excuse me, embracing––every video game and tabletop developer in sight, they are now breaking up the company into three surprising publicly traded companies.

CRAWL OUT THROUGH THE FALLOUT: As has everyone else on the plane, it seems, our hosts also check out the new hit Amazon Prime television show, Fallout, the most recent in big-budget video game adaptations.

DEADPOLE: The first full trailer for Deadpool & Wolverine dropped this week and it is surprisingly more…emotional?…than expected.

TOPICS:

(00:00) Intro – Embracer Group news
(09:16) Amazon Prime’s Fallout
(40:35) Outro – The trailer for Deadpool & Wolverine surprised D. Bethel
(43:30) Outtakes

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RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • A Sense of Place” (18 November 2018): Where Andrew shares his experiences diving into Fallout 76.

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The Deep Nerd Zone

The Deep Nerd Zone

WEEK IN GEEK: This week, our hosts are hard at work in the different worlds and in deep space as Andrew watches the first two episodes of the final season of Star Trek: Discovery while D. Bethel has a good time playing a scoundrel in Obsidian Entertainment’s The Outer Worlds.

TOPICS:
(00:00) Intro – We survived the eclipsageddon
(02:39) Andrew watches Star Trek: Discovery (Star Trek talk ensues)
(23:06) Dan gives a quick update upon finishing Sea of Stars
(24:10) D. gives first impressions on The Outer Worlds
(37:53) Outro – more eclipse talk.
(39:11) Outtakes

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A Relaxed Schedule

A Relaxed Schedule

WEEK IN GEEK: This week, Andrew finally learns the basics of Sex Education while D. Bethel is pleasantly surprised after being very turned off by Cyberpunk 2077.

RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • Two Matching Ties” (23 October 2015): When our hosts discuss “Back to the Future Day,” the day when reality caught up with the dystopian future portrayed in Back to the Future, Part II.
  • Mama Knight” (21 July 2023): Where our hosts discuss the WGA and SAG-AFTRA strike.

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Comma Dong

Comma Dong

W-AI-ZARDS OF THE COAST: With the publishing of Bigby Presents: Glory of the Giants! people noticed that some of the art looked…suspicious. It was revealed that the artist in question had used AI-engines to “enhance” the art they created for the book. Our hosts dive into this discussion and branch out from there.

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RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • Don’t Pull Out Your Deck” (14 July 2023): Where our hosts cite the tweet from a VFX artist on Flash who discusses the extreme conditions they are forced to work within.
  • Mama Knight” (21 July 2023): Where our hosts cover the details of the various entertainment strikes.

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L’Art d’Podcast

L’Art d’Podcast

WEEK IN GEEK: It’s all about television this week as Andrew finds a lot of great Fallout vibes in the AppleTV+ show, Silo, while D. Bethel finds it sad that the great Amazon Prime adaptation of the hit Image Comics series, Paper Girls, will never get a second season.

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Second Wind

Second Wind

THE WALKING SAD: With our hosts mostly caught up on HBO’s newest hit, The Last of Us, they dive deep into this stark and artful adaptation of the beloved video game series by Naughty Dog. Be warned that they discuss SPOILERS for the game and the show.

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  • Not that relevant, but here is the box art of the old PCRPG Andrew mentioned, Darklands:
Source: MicroProse/Wikipedia

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Non-Stop Jason

Non-Stop Jason

WEEK IN GEEK: This week, Andrew find a lot lacking in the latest open world RPG by Obsidian Entertainment, The Outer Worlds. D. Bethel, on the other hand, finds a lot to love going back and playing Capcom’s lost NES classic, Darkwing Duck.

RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • “Tile Pile” (22 November 2019): Where D. Bethel discusses his initial impressions of Outer Wilds (which is very much a different game than The Outer Worlds).
  • “Duck Law” (30 October 2020): Where Andrew and D. Bethel discuss “Let’s Get Dangerous”, the mid-third season premiere of Disney XD’s Ducktales that is dedicated to The Terror That Flaps In The Night himself.

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Earl British

Earl British

BETHESDA, WA: In a surprising turn of events––in the same week that Sony gathered all the attention for announcing the prices and release dates of its upcoming console(s)––Microsoft announced its acquisition of Bethesda Softworks––developer of the The Elder Scrolls series and the Fallout series and publisher of franchises like Doom and Wolfenstein––for a price tag of approximately $7.5 billion. Andrew and D. Bethel ruminate (and, at times, speculate) at what this could mean for Bethesda, and gaming, for the future.

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RELEVANT EPISODES:

  • Episode 61 – A Lot About Hmm” (21 Aug 2015): Where Andrew buys a Playstation Vita.
  • Nothing But Feet” (13 Dec 2019): Where D. Bethel discusses the sidelining of Campo Santo’s second game, In the Valley of the Gods, after Valve purchased the studio.
  • News Cruise” (07 Aug 2020): Where D. Bethel revealed that the Golden State Killer committed his first Sacramento crimes in his neighborhood.

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2019: No Time To Play

2019: No Time To Play

This year we are hosting a variety of looks back at 2019 as hosts and friends-of-the-show offer up the things that defined the year for them. Today we have our other co-host, Andrew Asplund, looking at the 2019 that was (to him).

For all intents and purposes, 2019 was a big year for all things nerdy and geeky. There were big movies, big video games, big TV shows, and big just about everything. When I looked back on the year, something stood out to me and it is encapsulated pretty well by my experience at PAX West back in September: despite being at one of the biggest game conventions in the United States, my notable memory from that event was my experience at the nearby parallel event, the Seattle Indies Expo.

What I realized was that 2019 became the year in which I began actively seeking out small studio and independent video game titles in lieu of more standard, big studio content. This isn’t mean to suggest that I never really played indie games before or that I entirely eschew big studio content. It’s more that my overall preference (at least with respect to video games) has changed enough that I noticed.

The (AAA) World Is Not Enough

It is important to begin this retrospective on 2019 with where it started: in January 2019, I was still excited to see where Bethesda Game Studios intended to go with theiruhhh, masterpieceFallout 76. But, shortly thereafter, I fell into the sublime oceans of Unknown Worlds’ Subnautica. Two months later, I discovered Hello Games’ No Man’s Sky. As the year went on, other small studio and indie titles made their way into my hands. It’s not that I stopped playing other games: July saw me finally pick up Capcom’s remake of Resident Evil 2 and in August, I spent a little bit of time with EA’s The Sims 4. And, to be honest, I still managed to find time to play some of the Bethesada Game Studios “classics,” which is to say Fallout 4 and Skyrim. But, by the time PAX West came to town, it felt like I couldn’t even be bothered to look at the big studio content.

A picture of a friend and me, tired of overgrown, AAA studio content.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I don’t write this to dismiss or deny the value of a well done AAA publisher title. Just a month or so ago, I was talking about my experience playing Hideo Kojima’s … masterpiece? … Death Stranding. I also spent time with FarCry Primal, a game I still consider one of the only pre-historic RPGs on the market.

Exceptions aside, it’s hard not to see the AAA video game market as a testament to … playing it safe. It’s a place where companies are willing to spend millions (or tens of millions) of dollars on a game title, which means their willingness to deviate from the standard of “what works” is minimal, to say the least.

From Indies With Love

In contrast, my interest in indie content, whether it be small studios of one or two developers or larger “triple-I” studios, has increased significantly. This year, I have dedicated seemingly countless hours to playing indie games. And, to an extent, I feel like that’s what has come to define my memory of 2019, at least insomuch as it relates to nerdy and geeky content.

I’m not necessarily looking for games that are this indie. Image source: 3909 LLC.

It’s not that I’m on some adventure to play especially bizarre video games. I’m far from somebody who is looking for video games that are #hashtag #edgy. As important and envelope-pushing as a game like Lucas Pope’s Papers, Please is, it’s not the kind of game I want to spend hundreds or even tens of hours playing. But, there’s something about a lot of these indie titles that I engage with. So often, these are games that a small group of people put a lot of work and feeling into. Not to say that big budget AAA games don’t have work and feeling. It just resonates with me that indie titles feel more less like a million dollar dog-pile and more like something that I could do with my friends.

It helps that 2019 was also the year that I completed a certificate in web development. What I originally started as something that might help me build a cool cooking website turned into something else entirely. An in-class assignment putting together a basic adventure game opened my eyes to the web as a tool for delivering game content; this eventually took me down a path of extremely amateurish game development. I started to really relate to the … allure of indie game development.

This is the kind of stuff big AAA studios just don’t do much anymore. Image Source: Picklefeet Games

Perhaps, for all intents and purposes, that’s why the Seattle Indies Expo became such a benchmark for my 2019 and a reflection of something that had been going on for me since the year began. Getting to actually meet the developers of games like Wildfire Swap, The Wind and Wilting Blossom, or Monster Jaunt really gave it all perspective. Maybe it’s just a little dose of childhood fantasy given perspective. As a young person I always dreamt of making games “when I grow up.” In a sense, 2019 was the year that I finally remembered that.

In the end, my look back on 2019 is a personal one. I have been playing a lot more indie games than I used to. I have started following more indie developers on Twitter and other social media. Honestly, I’m just trying to pay more attention to all of the creative people out there making their mark on gaming. And, as we move into 2020, I hope to start getting more involved in those communities as well.