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Posts related to actual comic books and webcomics.

Episode 141 – The Unpop Culture

Episode 141 – The Unpop Culture

WEEK IN GEEK: In a fit of nostalgia, Andrew picks up The Sims 3 again (starts at 1:49) while Dan can’t get past a nit-pick to enjoy anything Netflix’s Castlevania has to offer (20:46).

SDCC 2017: [starts at 34:04] It was a big weekend for nerd culture as the San Diego Comic Con dropped a bunch of new trailers on the world. Dan and Andrew look at three trailers and how they seem to be pointing out the creative direction of their respective studios with Marvel’s Thor: Ragnarok, DC/Warner Bros.’ Justice League, and Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One.

For reference, here are the three trailers the discussion focuses on.

Thor: Ragnarok

Justice League

Ready Player One

RELATED EPISODES:

WORKS CITED, REFERENCED, OR CONSULTED:

LINKS:

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

FEATURED MUSIC:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio

Shortcast 24 – What Is A Man

Shortcast 24 – What Is A Man

WEEK IN GEEK: With Andrew sick this week, the Shortcast ends up being a bit more organic than normal with both Andrew and D. sharing stories about this year’s Free Comic Book Day festivities. Specifically, Andrew got his hardback copy of Ms. Marvel, volume 1 signed by the creator herself, G. Willow Wilson, while Dan discusses the Hulu Original documentary, Batman & Bill.

LINKS:.

  • Visit our website at forallintents.net and leave your thoughts as comments on the page for this episode.
  • Join our Facebook page
  • E-mail: Andrew – andrew@forallintents.net, D. Bethel – dbethel@forallintents.net
  • Subscribe to our YouTube channel.
  • Subscribe to and review the show on the iTunes store.

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

FEATURED MUSIC:

-“Thunder Busters” by Wax Audio

Spotlight: Free Comic Book Day 2017

Spotlight: Free Comic Book Day 2017

This was written for and originally published on D. Bethel’s webcomic site, LongJohnComic.com.

Despite having missed last year’s Free Comic Book Day celebration at Empire’s Comics Vault, this year’s event passed like no time was lost. I’ll be honest, the main reason why I like to go back is to hang out for a day in a room with a bunch of people I know––some of whom I’ve known for years, a situation in which I rarely find myself. Personally, I looked at the event as a welcome reprieve as I had just collected about a hundred final portfolios from my writing classes (my day job) and had no problem delaying my head-first dive into them.

FCBD helped to delay the inevitable. D. Bethel at his desk with 97 writing porftolios. Photo by Shelley Blanton-Stroud

I was tabled between old friend and fellow webcomicker, Melissa Pagluica (who makes Above the Clouds), and artist Julie Okahara. All of us in our row were pretty much chit-chatting the entire time which made the time pass somewhat quickly (most of us had arrived by 7:30 am; it was a long day).

Because of the early hour, Ben (the owner of the shop) had allowed us to set up the day before the event. I fretted quite a bit with my table setup, but I ended up pretty happy with the final layout. Tabling at a show is an art in its own right, relying on visual rhetoric and some fundamental grasp on 3D design; I know a little about the former and go by feel for the latter. Ultimately, I was pretty happy with how it ended up.

D. Bethel’s table at FCBD 2017.

This event marked the debut of the Logan-inspired print, “Legacy,” as well as my sketch collection, BackMatter (which is now on sale in the store!) and though “Legacy” may not have been the most appropriate piece for this all-ages show, most people got a chuckle out of the Long John, volume 1 cover with kids pointing in shock, joy, or horror as they waited in line to grab their free comics.

Ben also allowed us who setup early the chance to grab what we wanted from the FCBD offerings, so I picked through having only glanced at what the titles would be.

Dan’s haul of the Free Comic Book Day books. Clockwise from the top left: 2000 AD, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I Hate Image, Guy Delisle’s Hostage (from Drawn & Quarterly), Bad Machinery, Boom! Studios 2017 Summer Blast, and Doctor Who.

So far, I’ve only sat down and read through Skottie Young’s I Hate Image, a short story featuring the protagonist from his hit Image book, I Hate Fairyland, and it is hilarious especially if you are familiar with some of the faces of key players at Image Comics. I’ve read through the Doctor Who book as well and found it a rather clever use of art to delineate different Doctors within the story. Bad Machinery was a surprise for me because I have been a fan of creator John Allison’s work for years back when he did a webcomic called Scary-Go-Round which he shuttered and replaced with a spinoff, Bad Machinery. While still doing webcomics, he has found success with the print comic, Giant Days, which he writes for Boom! comics. So, it was nice to see webcomics represented in the mix of Big 2 (Marvel and DC) and other major publishers.

I also picked up the most recent two issues of Melissa’s comic, which you can also get from her Etsy store (where issue 6 is on pre-order).

Issues 4 & 5 of Above the Clouds by Melissa Pagluica.

Lastly, I indulged in the very generous sale the store was having and picked up some books I had my eye on for awhile but never had the guts to take the plunge. I have not been shy about my love for the work of Becky Cloonan. I first really saw her work when she did a fill-in issue on Batman during the New 52 run and was blown away by her style. Soon after, I found her store online and bought her stuff, focusing on her single-issue short stories that are rather opaque but beautiful. These comics were called Wolves, The Mire, and Demeter. Opaque may be the wrong word for it; they’re just very sparse and open for interpretation. Reading her work is challenging and begs for re-reading. However, she has done work in more mainstream comics (as with Batman) in between her creator-owned passion projects. One of her early forays into sequential art was a series called Demo for Dark Horse Comics. Written by Brian Wood, it is a series of 18 stories each about a different teenager with a power of some kind. Since finishing, it has been made available in a big omnibus collection which I picked up at reasonable discount.

Books bought on discount at Free Comic Book Day (left to right): DC’s Wonder Woman, volume 1 (New 52) and Dark Horse Comics’ Demo.

Also, with the Wonder Woman movie arriving in June, I figured I should not be a poser and actually read some Wonder Woman. Of DC’s initial “New 52” launch (many books were cancelled and new ones introduced later in the New 52 lifespan), I remember hearing very positive things about what Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang were doing with Wonder Woman. At the time, I liked keeping my net shallow and the only New 52 book I read was Batman. But now that the New 52 is done and that story is completed, I figured that (with a sale, to boot) it would be the perfect chance to go back and check out this run on a classic character. I haven’t dug into it yet but Nicole––my spouse––has thoroughly enjoyed it so far.

I came away from the day exhausted with some good sales and even better conversations. With luck, I look forward to doing it again next year.

Worth a Look

Worth a Look

It’s no surprise by now that I’m a fervent X-Men apologist and proudly so. Such sentiments are only bolstered by their very strange treatment by Marvel over the last eight or so years. Most of my conspiratorial talk is just for fun, but there are some details that eke through and seem just a bit too shady to be mere coincidence. There was the omission of any mutants from the cover of Marvel’s 75th Anniversary magazine, which was given away for free (which Andrew and I discussed early in our show’s history). Since then, they have made Cyclops––the boy scout figurehead of the mutants (ostensibly the Superman of the X-Men)––a terrorist murderer (#cyclopswasright), they have legit killed the most famous mutant character, Wolverine, and now they are having the team nobody really knows about (but they really want people to know about) fight the team they want everyone to forget about in the “Inhumans vs. X-Men” event (but not before they have a prologue event literally called “The Death of X”).

source: marvel.com
source: marvel.com

Comicsverse are, admittedly, as apologetic about the X-Men as I am, but they approach this topic with a collectively cooler head. Jack Fisher’s article looks at what he describes as the problem with this fight beyond the obviously corporate undertones that poison the well. He sees this forced skirmish as a severely problematic one based on the origin of these teams and how these continuous “…vs. X-Men” storylines are doing more cultural damage in the long run even if books are being sold. Fisher boils it down beautifully:

Whatever the outcome and whatever the legal undertones, the concept between Inhumans vs. X-Men is flawed. On one side, you have a minority that has been forcibly sterilized twice in the past decade. On the other, you have a team with a tradition of racism, xenophobia, and slavery. It’s not a battle between heroes as much as it is an exercise in contrivance.

I don’t know much about the Inhumans, but it seems that in the cinematic universe they are building them from the ground up. On more than one occasion, it has been noted (especially by co-host Andrew) that they’re just trying to slot them in the empty socket where mutants normally go. But that exacerbates the problem, I would argue.

It’s not as the Den of Geek article linked to in the last paragraph argues that the Inhumans are “the same basic idea, but with the serial numbers filed off.” It’s worse than that. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. Mutants were created to represent the minorities of this country and to dramatize their plight and struggle to accomplish two things: first, it presents these otherwise uncomfortable and possibly unknown issues to the predominantly white readership; second, it gives minorities (be it color, creed, gender, or sexual orientation) a safe place to go in the world of comics. The X series of books is about showing what true prejudice, bias, and hate looks like and having the minority survive.

And what happens?

In 2005, editor-in-chief, Joe Quesada instructs the X-writers to kill off all mutants except for 198. Genocide. Narratively (and creatively), it made sense. Mutants work best when they are a minority. But they were also presented as being the next stage in human evolution. With so many mutants on the planet (by 2005, at least) it seemed that theory was correct––science wins again––until they were forcibly made a minority again. That, of course, was the big event. But the small things, such as the omission from the Marvel 75th Anniversary Magazine cover, killing off fan-favorite characters, pitting C-level characters against them, etc., when piled together that makes a pretty loud squeaky wheel. Holistically, it looks like corporate monkey-wrenching and favoritism and simple catering to what is popular right now. But that isn’t all of it.

When taken in as a whole with the knowledge of what the X-Men actually mean, it looks like the type of thing the scared majority does to keep a minority down, and, in this day and age, it’s rather sickening.

With Halloween behind us, a lot of Lovecraft-focused articles circulated around the internet in celebration of the ghastly day. Mostly well-trod biographies or overviews of his racism, these are valid and important conversations to have as they can add a lot to the knowledge of the casual consumer. Much like the Luke Cage article I shared before, the most interesting article that I saw this last week was a roundtable discussion of Lovecraft and his work by three writers whose works have been influenced by his mythos: Kij Johnson, Cassandra Khaw, and Ruthanna Emrys.

Cover image from The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe by Kij Johnson, source: barnesandnoble.com
Cover image from The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe by Kij Johnson, source: barnesandnoble.com

The conversation is important because, despite being short, it digs deeper than a normal roundtable usually goes. The interviewer gets right to the point and discusses Lovecraft’s racism and what his legacy should be in a modern context, and––even better––the writers don’t shy away from giving tough answers.

As a reader of both Lovecraft and Lovecraft criticism, I belong to a few Lovecraftian fan pages on Facebook in the hope that there will be discussion as found in Joel Cunningham’s article. However, on the whole it’s a rather soft engagement with the material. What frustrates, however, is whenever an article that addresses his racism or intolerance starts making its way around the internet, the claws come out and the hate speech––for lack of a better word––fills the subsequent comments. Just as bad is the insistence on apathy in many cases, and that is a tragedy.

To say anything about Lovecraft’s work requires an acknowledgement of his love for the sciences. Like, a capital-L Love. The scientific method is all about asking questions, not picking sides. Science seeks to find how things thread into their place within the context of the universe and to see how that weave is part of a larger puzzle, a puzzle getting larger all the time. Science does not reward partisanship or apathy, it rewards the explorer. The fact that most Lovecraft stories warn people away from the scientific method is because Lovecraft himself was intrigued by the seemingly infinite possibility that science could offer us and then turned it on its ear for dramatic purposes. Why? Because horror stories are fun.

Again, referring to that previous Luke Cage roundtable I previously linked to, this type of conversation that these writers have about Lovecraft are the types of conversations we should be having because they are new and interesting and the ultimate outcome of this discourse is not to decide whether Lovecraft should be banished from modern thought or not––far from it. If we did that, we would be unable to have some interesting conversations. If anything, it would actually more firmly establish his place in the canon as someone worth talking about. Simply brushing off his racism will only keep him from reaching that place where I, most certainly, and most Lovecraft fans feel he should be woven into.

Shortcast 13 – So Arch, So Blue

Shortcast 13 – So Arch, So Blue

This week D. Bethel brings on Elijah Kaine to talk about the X-Men in anticipation of this week’s release of X-Men: Apocalypse. They discuss not only the filmic franchise but also of the themes of the X-Men in general and how they fit in with the greater Marvel universe.

Read Elijah’s writing at the Geek Intellectualist.

Check out his gaming streams at twitch.tv/wthhero.

Leave a comment on the topic(s) discussed this week at forall.libsyn.com. Be sure to join the official Facebook page as well for exclusive links and discussion. E-mail the show at forallpod [at] gmail.com. Also, help the show out by leaving a review on the iTunes store.

For all intents and purposes, that was a Shortcast recap.

Featured Music:

-“Thunder Busters” by Wax Audio
-“X-Men Theme (from ‘The Animated Series’)” by Otaku Attack
-“X-Men Theme Song” by Robert J. Walsh (from “Pryde of the X-Men”)

Shortcast 12 – Punch the Microphone

Shortcast 12 – Punch the Microphone

It’s the return of the Summer Shortcast!

Extra-Long Week in Geek: Andrew watches Deadpool and Dan reads the Dark Phoenix Saga and also talks about the death of animator and comicker, Darwyn Cooke.

Links:

Batman Beyond – Darwyn Cooke’s Batman 75th Anniversary Short

Featured Music:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio
-“Thunder Busters” by Wax Audio

Episode 92 – The Microbox

Episode 92 – The Microbox

Week in Geek: Andrew attends Emerald City Comic Con while Dan attends the Sacramento Indie Arcade Gaming Expo.

The New Strange: The teaser trailer for the newest Marvel Cinematic Universe franchise, Dr. Strange, was released to the world this week adding to the already high anticipation. Can Benedict Cumberbatch bring a classic Marvel character to life?

Hard Games: With Dark Souls III finally being released stateside this week, Dan and Andrew sit and talk about the trend toward very hard video games. Where does it come from? Why do we like this kind of punishment?

Leave your thoughts on this week’s topics as a comment at forall.libsyn.com. Be sure to join our official Facebook and Google+ pages for conversations. E-mail the show with any questions or comments at forallpod [at] gmail.com. Help the show out by leaving a review on the iTunes store.

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

Links:

-“At the Mountains of Madness” animated short by The SpookySpookyShoggoths.
-“After 15 Years of Disappointment, Can Final Fantasy Be Great Again?” An interview with Final Fantasy XV director, Hajime Tabata by John Robertson (via arstechnica).
Skirmish Entertainment, a Sacramento indie developer whose game, End of the Mine, was at the Sacramento Indie Arcade Gaming Expo.
Rocktastic Games, a San Francisco Bay-area developer whose game, Rogue Continuum, was featured at the Sacramento Indie Arcade Gaming Expo.

Featured Music:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio
-“People are Strange” by Echo and the Bunnymen
-“Still Alive” by Aperture Science Psychoacoustic Laboratories (from Portal)
-“Taxman” by Stevie Ray Vaughan

Episode 91 – Trying to Keep Sharp

Episode 91 – Trying to Keep Sharp

Week in Geek: Andrew plays through Resident Evil HD Remaster while Dan struggles with the humor and politics of Broforce.

All in a Name: An incredible blowout occurred on the internet after certain fans of Baldur’s Gate found, in the recent expansion Baldur’s Gate: The Siege of Dragonspear, an openly trans character and found it offensive, for a variety of reasons. Dan and Andrew ruminate on this and associated controversy in the realm of video games to varying degrees of civility and calm demeanor.

DC Comics Talk with Andrew and Luke: Andrew has a sit down with Luke Turpeinen from AcrossTheBoardGames.net about all things DC (perhaps touching on the issues around Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice).

Leave a comment on the topics of this episode at forall.libsyn.com. Be sure to join our official Facebook and Google+ pages. Email the show at forallpod [at] gmail.com. If you want to help the show, be sure to leave a review (stars and/or text reviews) at the iTunes store page for this show.

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

Links:

“Caped Crusader, Or Cruel Sadist? Miller Makes One Fan Wonder” by Kim Fu (via NPR)––this is republished from a 2014 article in the light of the Batman presented in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.
“The Inside Story of Recording Metal Gear Solid by Ben Hanson (via GameInformer), and audio documentary.
“Watch Mega Man Produce Keiji Inafune Make a Mario Maker Stage” by Nick Robinson (via Polygon).
Baldur’s Gate Studio Responds to Harassment Over Trans Character” by Colin Campbell (via Kotaku).

Featured Music:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio
-“Why Can’t We Be Friends?” by WAR
-“Superman Inside” by Eric Clapton
-“Dog on Fire” by They Might Be Giants

Episode 90 – Keep Calm, You’re a Warrior Princess

Episode 90 – Keep Calm, You’re a Warrior Princess

Week in Geek: Andrew watched an entry from the DC Animated Universe, an adaptation of Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox while Dan saw the Disney Animated feature, Zootopia.

Men in Capes, Punching: Both Dan and Andrew have seen Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and have things to say about it.

Share your opinions about any of this week’s topics by leaving a comment at forall.libsyn.com. Be sure to join the official Facebook and Google+ pages for exclusive links and conversations with other fans. Send us an e-mail at forallpod [at] gmail.com. Help spread the word by leaving a review (starred or text) on the iTunes Store page for the show.

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

Featured Music:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio
-“Is She With You (Wonder Woman Theme)” by Hans Zimmer & Junkie XL (from Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice)
-“Be Prepared” by Jeremy Irons (from The Lion King)

Episode 86 – Starting Pause

Episode 86 – Starting Pause

Week in Geek: Andrew spends some time in Portland, Oregon and hangs out at one of its popular gamer bars, Ground Control. Dan reads Marvel’s 2014 mini-series, Deadpool vs. X-Force and really enjoys some clever meta-retcon that happens.

Narrative Bifurcation: Dan and Andrew discuss some of the possibilities brought on by Nintendo’s very interesting release of Fire Emblem Fate, which is actually two full-priced releases, Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright and Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest.  Even then, the ostensible ending is only available via paid-DLC (titled Fire Emblem Fates: Revelation). It’s a dangerous tactic, but can be used for good as well.

Bye Bye Bioware: Over the last few years, major players at famed video game developer, Bioware, have been hemorrhaging from the company at a surprising rate. However, is it the sign of doom some people are predicting?

Leave a comment about this week’s show at forall.libsyn.com, or at the official Facebook or Google+ pages. You may also e-mail the show at forallpod [at] gmail.com. If you would like to help the show out, the best way to do so would be to leave a review on iTunes.

For all intents and purposes, that was an episode recap.

Relevant Links & Interesting Reading:

-“The Great Bioware Exodus and the Future of Western RPGs” by Matthew Loffhagen from EquityArcade.

-“Fire Emblem Fates‘ Pronged Success Could Affect the Future of Game Publishing” by Nick Zappulla from EquityArcade.

Radio Times‘ exclusive trailer for the upcoming Big Finish Doctor Who audio dramas featuring David Tennant and Catherine Tate as the 10th Doctor and Donna Noble.

Featured Music:

-“Stayin’ in Black” by Wax Audio
-“Two Of Us” by The Beatles
-“The Citadel” by Richard Jacques, Jack Wall, and Sam Hulick
-“Rockin’ Robin” by Bobby Day